Penalty And Racial Disparities Thesis

Penalty And Racial Disparities Thesis-22
A 1988 study by Sheldon Ekland-Olson found that in the first decade after Furman, criminal cases in Texas involving white victims were more likely to result in a death sentence than those involving either black or Hispanic victims.A 1990 Government Accountability Office analysis of 28 studies, in 82% of these studies, found that murder cases with white victims were more likely than those with black victims to result in a death sentence.

A 1988 study by Sheldon Ekland-Olson found that in the first decade after Furman, criminal cases in Texas involving white victims were more likely to result in a death sentence than those involving either black or Hispanic victims.A 1990 Government Accountability Office analysis of 28 studies, in 82% of these studies, found that murder cases with white victims were more likely than those with black victims to result in a death sentence.

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In 1999, the rates were at 15,552 and slowly increased to 17,030.

In comparison to the 24,703 disclosed in 1991, these numbers have gradually declined and become more consistent.

In 1983, David Baldus co-authored a study that found that capital punishment in Georgia since the decision in Furman v.

Georgia was handed down 1972 had been applied unevenly across race.

In 1998, Baldus published another study which concluded that black defendants in certain types of murder cases in Philadelphia were almost four times as likely to be sentenced to death than were their white counterparts.

In 1981, Gary Kleck published a literature review that declared that all states, except the Southern United States, found that African Americans were less likely than white Americans to be sentenced to death or executed.After a discussion of nine of the most prevalent shortcomings in previous research, this article critically examines the contemporary presentencing literature to ascertain the extent to which a discrimination thesis (DT) receives empirical support.It reviews the findings from 52studies conducted since 1970 that employ multivariate statistical analysis.Specifically, his and his colleagues' study found that only 15 out of 246 murder cases (6%) where the victim was black resulted in a death sentence, as compared with 85 out of 348 (24%) of such cases when the victim was white.This study led to Warren Mc Cleskey's death sentence being challenged due to allegations that it was racially biased.Methods: Inpatient claims for 2,414,205 Medicare beneficiaries from Florida, New York, and Washington State were used as the primary data source.The study period (2009-2013) included at least 2 years of baseline data prior to each hospital initiating participation in MU.The report described this relationship as "remarkably consistent across data sets, states, data collection methods, and analytic techniques." A 1995 study by Jonathan Sorensen and Donald H.Wallace found evidence of a racial bias in capital punishment in Missouri, mainly in regards to the race of the victim.The review also found that cases with black victims were less likely than those with white victims to result in the death sentence, possibly as a result of the devaluing of black crime victims.The same study found that after controlling for the race of the victim, there was no clear evidence that the race of the defendant predicted how likely they were to receive a death sentence.

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