Third Grade Homework Sheets

Third Grade Homework Sheets-36
Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each.Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.

Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size]; build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.

Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape.

Show the measurements by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in whole-number units.

Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories.

For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 ×7.

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each.Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of.Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares.Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 18 = 10 8]; understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has "more of"/"less of" the attribute, and describe the difference.For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷8.Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10.Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 6 = 8 2 4 = 10 4 = 14]; decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9]; using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4]; and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 6 1 = 12 1 = 13). Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

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